Church Bells Ringing…

While clearing and organizing my desk last night, I was pleased to find many things I’d forgotten I’d received.  One was a package of vintage church postcards swap-bot “digitalmaven” sent earlier this year. I’m sure, after thanking her for the wonderful collection, I returned the postcards to the envelope intending to study them later.  Later never came.  Then (after clearing my desk), I began gathering photos to send in a  photo “destash” swap and I ran across one of the photos of a rustic church I shot last year when visiting my in-laws.  I had no choice but share in a blog post the beautiful vintage church postcards.

Here, first, is the photo that’s probably heading out this week:

Chapel of Peace

Chapel of Peace, Ferguson, North Carolina

I posted photos from a trip to the Whippoorwill Academy and Village in a couple of earlier posts here and here.  The quaint “Chapel of Peace” is often used for small wedding ceremonies.  I added the verse from Emily Dickinson’s Poem 236 because it reminds us that while we are strengthened through meeting in fellowship with those who share our spiritual principles, it is also necessary to spend time alone with God, commune with Him in nature, and enjoy our bits of heaven on earth.

Digitalmaven sent seven vintage postcards:

The United Methodist Memorial Home, Chancel of the Applegate Chapel

Chancel of the Applegate Chapel. Le France Color Fotos, Westerville, OH.

The Chancel of the Applegate Chapel is part of the United Methodist Memorial Home in Warren, Indiana. The Chapel offers a place for residents to mediate and worship.

The Wayfarers Chapel

“The Wayfarers Chapel.” Photo by Union Pacific Railroad, Published and Distributed by Columbia.

The Wayfarer’s Chapel, often called “The Glass Church,” is located on the coast of the Palos Verdes Hills near Portuguese Bend, California.

Saint Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral, Los Angeles, California

“The Bishop’s Throne,” Saint Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral, Los Angeles, California. Lithochrome Press, Los Angeles.

From this seat, “The Bishop’s Throne,” situated always in the south chancel, the ranking prelate presides over services.  The throne is symbolic of episcopal authority by which the Greek Church is governed.  In the rear panel of the canopy is a representation of Christ the High Priest, and below it the ancient device of the Byzantine Empire, the two-headed eagle, suggestive of watchfulness.  The lions reference Revelation 5:5:

. . . The Lion of the tribe of Judah, the root of David, has conquered so that he can open the scroll and its seven seals.

Naval Air Station Chapel, Alameda, California

Naval Air Station Chapel, Alameda, California. Card by H.S. Crocker Co., Inc., San Francisco.

The Station Chapel, dedicated in 1943, actually consists of three chapels:  the Blessed Sacrament Chapel where daily Mass is celebrated for Roman Catholics; the Shannon Chapel which is used for small groups of non-Catholics; and the Main Chapel, seating approximately 400, which is shared by all faiths in the spirit of “Cooperation Without Compromise.”

C129-Pasadena, California

C129-Pasadena, California.  Kodachrome Reproduction by Mike Roberts Studios, Berkeley, CA.

Part of Southern California’s charm is due to its pleasing architecture. An example of beauty in buildings is the church above in the garden city of Pasadena.

Strawberry Chapel, a Chapel of Ease to Saint John's Biggin Church

Strawberry Chapel.  Photo by Stafford; Published by Berkeley County Bicentennial Commission.

Strawberry Chapel was constructed in 1725 by an Act of Assembly as a Chapel of Ease to Saint John’s Biggin Church.  It is one of the most famous historic sites in Berkeley County.

Sinclair Memorial Chapel on the Campus of Coe College, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Sinclair Memorial Chapel on the Campus of Coe College, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Es-N-Len Photos, Aurora, IL.

A focal point of activities on the Coe College campus is Sinclair Memorial Chapel, also known as the Coe Auditorium.  Replacing an earlier chapel destroyed by fire, it is named in honor of the T. M. Sinclair meat-pakcing family.  The building also houses Arthur Poe Chapel, a small sanctuary for meditation, and two art galleries.

After visiting these postcards, I’m tempted to go through my postcard collections and pull out other postcards featuring church buildings.  I’ll have to put that on hold, though.  My to-do list is a little too long at the moment.  For now…

Enjoy!

[Note: all descriptions are from the backs of the postcards].

Previous Post
Leave a comment

1 Comment

  1. Playing with Black and White (Part III): Buildings | Pics and Posts

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: