Children’s Book Illustration Postcards: A Quick Look at the Next Eight

I’m back with more children’s book illustration postcards, finally. The eight postcards below are familiar favorites from around the world.

Classic Pooh from Marianne in the Netherlands:

Swap 21: Winnie-the-Pooh, A.A. Milne and E.H. Shepard

You already know how I feel about Pooh. The cool thing about the Pooh card is I have the Classic Pooh postcard collection it comes from, so when I received the postcard, it felt like one that I sent into the world returned to me.

Mr. Men from Lihior in Israel:

BLC Swap 21: Mr. Mischief’s New Year, Mr. Men Annual (1987)

My son has a sizable collection of the Mr. Men and Little Miss books that can’t seem to part with. I’m pretty sure I enjoyed reading them to him more than he enjoyed hearing them. As a toddler, he was a bit “creeped out” by Mr. Nosey.

Tootles from Susan in St. Paul, Minnesota:

Swap 22: “Frolic.” From Tootle by Gertrude Crampton. Illustrated by Tibor Gergely, 1945

Tootle is a Little Golden Book, originally published in 1945,  and though I’m familiar with the collection, I’m not sure I’ve seen this one before. Here’s a description of the book from Penguin Random House:

In this classic Little Golden Book from 1945, Tootle is a young locomotive who loves to chase butterflies through the meadow. But he must learn to stay on the tracks no matter what—if he ever hopes to achieve his dream of being a Flyer between New York and Chicago!

Continuing with children’s books published in the 1940s, “A Baby Puffin” from Geraldine in Canada:

BLC Swap 22: ABC, 1943. Cover illustration by Dorothy Chapman

A Janosch illustration from Katrin in Germany:

Swap 23: “And good luck.” Janosch

According to Katrin,  the colorful books are very popular in Gemany. This one took a few too many “mail tattoos” as it winged its way to me, but the postage and cute Janosch stickers on back made up for the marks on front. [Click an image for a closer look].

Check out the photo essay on Janosch and his books here: Children’s Book Author Janosch at 85.

“Baby” Alice from Jeni in Indianapolis, Indiana:

BLC Swap 23:  The Macmillan Alice. “The cover of The Nursery Alice, first published in 1890, was designed and coloured by Emily Gertrude Thomson.”

I’m “holding my typing keys” and trying not to write much about this card. I have a nice collection of Alice in Wonderland postcards that I’m planning to blog about soon.

There’s a quote on the back of the card from Lewis Carroll’s diary, dated February 15, 1881:

I wrote to Macmillan to suggest a new idea: a ‘Nursery Edition’ of Alice with pictures printed in colour.

Another Pooh card from Marianne:

Winnie-the-Pooh.

It took some abuse in travel, but Pooh and Tigger were untouched.

Little Plum, another Puffin cover, from Geraldine in Canada:

BLC Swap 24: Little Plum, Cover illustration by Jean Primrose

I haven’t read Little Plum, but its description reminds me of childhood friends and that “one doll” that was never a first choice:

When Gem moves into The House Next Door, Nona and Belinda think she’s stuck up and vow to have nothing to do with her. But the beautiful Japanese doll in her window soon attracts their attention. They name her Little Plum because of the plum blossom decorating her clothes – but unlike Nona’s Japanese dolls, Miss Happiness and Miss Flower, Little Plum seems sad, unloved and uncared for. Will the three girls – and the three dolls – ever become friends?  —Pan Macmillan

That’s it for today.  Students and papers call…

Have a happy week!

3 thoughts on “Children’s Book Illustration Postcards: A Quick Look at the Next Eight

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