#ThursdayTreeLove | Notice, Pause, and Wonder.

In her October 11 #ThursdayTreeLove, Parul Thakur wrote about how people are oblivious to the trees they pass every day. She urged readers to “notice things around you and within you. Take nothing for granted. Nothing.”

My work environment is filled with gorgeous trees. I generally pass the same trees during my [almost] daily walk, but I “never, ever, ever” tire of them; there’s always something new or different to note. In fact, yesterday, as I was on my way to a warm spot to meditate and write, I was so distracted by the trees that my writing hour slipped away.

Unlike my tree venture two weeks ago, yesterday the trees provided the therapy I’d planned to find in writing.

Like Parul, when I’m enjoying the trees, I see others passing by with absolutely no awareness of them. Every now and then, they stop, wonder, and ask about what I’m observing or photographing. After a brief conversation, they pause and take note before walking away. I “cross my fingers” and hope they will no longer take the trees for granted.

If we’re not careful, trees will become part of the mundane, ordinary of our day to day, and they are much too beautiful, too knowing, too giving, too spectacular to be ordinary.


I am joining Parul Thakur for #ThursdayTreeLove every second and fourth Thursday of the month. If you would like to play along, post a picture of a tree on your blog and link it back to her latest #treelove post.

27 thoughts on “#ThursdayTreeLove | Notice, Pause, and Wonder.

  1. franhunne4u says:

    Yes, we should not take anything for granted – but if we keep wondering about the whole world – would we get things done? Sometimes a little routine is necessary, where you do not pause and wonder about everything. But of course you should not lose your ability to see slight differences, because sometimes those little differences are important tell-tale signs. To come back to trees – a tree that does not grow fresh leaves on one branch, lose pieces of tree bark on the sidewalk when it has become too hot and dry (was the thing here, where we and our trees are not used to such long, hot and dry summers as we had this year) or trees losing their leaves early – all very, very important signs of a change in environment or a change in the tree.

    Yes, I know this is not a spiritual approach.
    “Pragmatism considers thought as an instrument or tool for prediction, problem solving and action, and rejects the idea that the function of thought is to describe, represent, or mirror reality.”

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Ellen Hawley says:

    I never managed to love winter–especially when I lived in Minnesota, where it was cold enough to cause pain–but I did learn to love the bare trees at least as much as their leafy summer forms. They’re gorgeous.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Cherryl says:

    I used to notice trees more when on holiday – taking pictures of them, admiring them….and then when I’d get home I’d be oblivious to them – even though I’d be passing some beautiful trees every day. Now I guess I try to be a bit more ‘in the moment’ and soak up whatever is around me, and appreciate it. There is definitely something quite therapeutic about trees – maybe it’s the fact that they represent deep roots, strength, growth, long life and stature – pride, things us humans can relate to, and long for.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Parul Thakur says:

    Those are some beautiful views. I loved the sky too in most of your pictures. I am so glad we are similar in how we think about trees and our surroundings. I also look at the same tree and wonder about different things. Thank you for joining! So grateful that you are a part of the journey.

    Liked by 1 person

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