Postcard: Cotentin and a Bit of Art Therapy

We’re in a new month and Cy is back from Madrid, so there’s no “Snapshots from Madrid” today. Instead, we take a brief trip to France.

My globetrotting photographer-blogger friend Louise of Drops of Everything has been doing a lot of travel this summer–she’s in Italy at the moment–and just last week I received a gorgeous postcard from Normandy. I was pleasantly surprised and tickled because I sent her a postcard from New Orleans two days after this one began its journey to me.

En Normandie, Cherbourg. Photo by Franck Godard.

Louise shares stunning images from her travels via her Facebook page, Louise Mamet Photography. She has a thing for water vehicles. The first image she sent to me is entitled “Shipyard of Camaret.”

Based on descriptions I’ve read, Cotentin sounds divine, like the perfect escape from reality:

The Cotentin peninsula in Normandy is a land of wilderness, lulled by the wind and the sea, a land of hidden treasures : La Hague, Val de Saire, UNESCO heritage sites, and lands of art and history.  –from LaManche Tourism

Normandy is the birthplace of Impressionism, one of my favorite art movements, and the description perfectly relates what attracted artists to the area. I’m sure scenes such as this one (minus the buildings) inspired many impressionist masterpieces, so I “reimagined” the image as one.

Godard’s “Cotentin” reimagined as an Impressionist painting. Edited with Impresso App.

The photograph was expertly captured by Franck Godard. You can see more of his Normandy work by visiting his page.

After a week of long meetings, art is the prescription I need, so this weekend, I’m pulling out my art books to feed my soul and my paint to have a little creative fun.

What are you up to this weekend? Be sure to do something that feeds your soul!

Up on the Roof in France with “The Drifters”

On the roof, it’s peaceful as can be
And there the world below don’t bother me.

I’ve been singing The Drifter’s 1962 major hit, “Up on the Roof” for weeks now.  I can’t get it out of my head! Why this random singing of a song that was written before I was born? The culprit is this postcard sent to me for a Liberate Your Art side swap:

“Rooftop in Apremont-sur-Allier” by Louise Mamet

The rooftop photo was captured by my blog pal Louise of Drops of Everything.  Louise has such a unique perspective. I always enjoy her postcards and her blog.

This particular photo features the rooftop of an old home in the “adorable village” of Apremont-sur-Allier in France.  I am really interested in architecture–I especially enjoy studying the similarities of architecture in different areas of the world–so this was the perfect selection for me.

Louise sent her postcard in an envelope and included a splendid postcard advertising an exhibit at the Grand Pressigny–La Femme dans la Préhistoire  [Women in Prehistory]–a subject right up my alley.  Now, I just have to figure out how to get to France by the end of November.  😉

La Femme dans la Préhistoire

She also included one of her business cards which is so perfect I can’t resist sharing it here.

Photo by Louise Mamet

You can find more of Louise’s photography on her blog: Drops of Everything and on Facebook.

Louise prefers postcards in envelopes, so when I sent a postcard to her I included a postcard reproduction of artist/illustrator/graphic novelist Eric Drooker’s  “On the Roof” to prolong our visual conversation.

“On the Roof” by Eric Drooker

Up on the roof, up on a roof
Everything is alright, everything is alright

I didn’t realize when I sent the photo that I’d be introducing Louise to a new artist, so that was a bonus.  And your bonus–the perfect song to end the week.  Take a listen.

Maybe, you’ll be singing “Up on the Roof” too!

A Community Called “Fishtown”

I am so happy that Thanksgiving break is finally here! Now, I can finally catch up on everything, including blogging.  I have lots to share, but since blogging is not the most urgent matter on my list, I just have a simple post for today.

"Fishtown" by Pete Nicholls

“A View of Fishtown” by Pete Nicholls

I received this stunning photo postcard yesterday.  This view of a Michigan community called “Fishtown” was captured by Pete Nicholls, coordinator of the “Photographic Postcard” swaps on swap-bot.  He writes that he post-processed the image in Photoshop to give it an “artsy flair.”  He certainly succeeded. “Artsy” is exactly how I described the postcard before I even read his note!

You can see more of Pete’s work on his blog: Pete Nicholls.  Check him out!

 

Playing with Black and White: Flowers

I’ve been experimenting on and off with black and white photography for a few years now, but I was recently “inspired” by Amy Saab’s blog post “The Roses Had Spots” to set up a series of swaps in the “A Thousand Words” group on swap-bot.

There are a number of photography groups on swap-bot. I belong to three or four. This group is different in that it requires photographers to be at least “intermediate” level and capable of crafting more sophisticated or thoughtful swaps using photos–beyond the simple “snap a shot and send it.” We’re a small group by swap-bot standards, but many of the members are serious hobbyists who may have taken a class or two or who have sold their photographic work at craft shows or in online shops. The idea is to challenge each other to grow and provide constructive feedback when necessary.

In her post, Amy Saab shared “flawed” roses in black and white. She “removed the color to show their beautiful structure.” I’ve done the same thing with “flawed” photos of flowers, buildings, people, and other subjects.

Even without “imperfections,” black and white photography reveals beauty in ways that we often miss because of all the color. Don’t get me wrong. I love the brilliance of color photography, but an image composed in black and white can be breathtaking.

So far, I’ve hosted three “black and white” (or monochrome) swaps–in October, November, and December 2014.  Instead of showcasing the photographs in one blog post, I will share the photos in three separate posts.

The first swap in the series was “Flowers in Black and White.” Swappers were to alter photos of flowers already in their collections and select what they consider the best two and send the B&W photos to their partners. They were encouraged, but not required, to send the color photos as well.

My partner, “Midteacher,” sent four sets. I’m sharing two because the other two are either buried under my desk clutter or are sitting in the collection of notecards I keep at work just in case I get the urge to write a note or letter during a break.

Flower in Purple by DBW

“Balloon Flower” by DBW aka Midteacher

Midteacher writes that she loves B&W photography because of the details the photos expose. “By taking away the color,” she writes, “the eye focuses on the textures and details of the shot.”

Flower in Black and White by DBW

“Balloon Flower in Black and White” by DBW aka Midteacher

She writes that she “loves the veins in this shot.”

Purple is my favorite color and I love seeing purple in nature, but I’m having a difficult time staying loyal to purple in this instance.

Midteacher also sent my favorite flower, a sunflower. She loves the industrious bee who was too “busy to notice me standing away with my camera.”

The Bee and the Sunflower by DBW

“The Bee and the Sunflower” by DBW aka Midteacher

The sunflower is stunning in black and white, especially with the added texture that doesn’t show up so well in the scan below.

The Bee and the Sunflower in Black and White by Dee

“The Bee and the Sunflower in Black and White” by DBW aka Midteacher

I sent my partner four sets of flowers in B&W. Two that appear in earlier posts–dogwood blossoms and daisies–and one that will be featured in a future post, so I’ll share only one of them here.

Untitled 2 2I shot this one in color some time during Fall 2013. The original color image also appears in an earlier post. It was one of the images I used to make a postcard for International Women’s Day 2014. The B&W photo was a bit “blah,” so I used sepia instead.

Here are two I intended to send when I began planning the swap, but I completely forgot about them when I put the swap together.  (Sorry Newfie!)

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I captured the water lily while on a Mother’s Day visit to the New Orleans Botanical Gardens. The lavender flower was my favorite shot of the day.  I like the photo in B&W, but I love the color one.  I found the bright orange and yellow flower while taking a walk one summer day.

Here are two bonus postcards Beckra (RR) sent.

“Wild Alium” by Beckra (RR)

“Blackberry Blossom,” by Beckra (RR).

She writes, “In early autumn Arkansas seems to undergo a second spring of sorts.  Flowers that had lapsed during the heat of summer re-emerge.”

Beckra and I were on the same photographic page when I put the swap together. She had just ordered these B&W postcards when she read the swap description, so she decided to share them with me.  I always appreciate her photographic interpretation of her world.

I’ll post the second part, “Black and White with a Touch of Color,” tomorrow.

Oh, my hubby has finally joined the blogosphere here on WordPress. While you anxiously wait for my next post, head over to his page and show him some blog love. 🙂  Find him here:  Viewfinder.

See ya later!

Illuminations, or “Check out My Big Bro!”

"Green Belt" by Dennis Tyler Photography

“Green Belt” by Dennis Tyler Photography

This is less a blog post and more a shout out to my older brother, Dennis, whose work is now on exhibit at Agora Gallery in the Big Apple.  Dennis is an amazing photographer who has, for my entire life at least, always had a camera in his hand.

Illuminations: an Exhibition of Fine Art demonstrates “the thoughtful beauty of Dennis Tyler’s photography” which “emerges with an ethereal clarity, capturing fragments of eternity in an exquisite visual meditation” (from Agora Gallery Press Release).

If you’re in New York anytime between November 4 and November 25, drop by and take a gander at his work. Agora Gallery is located at 530 West 25th Street, New York, NY (212.226.4151).

Click the image to go to Agora Gallery and for more information about Dennis Tyler’s exhibit

If you can’t get to New York this month, check out his work here: Dennis Tyler Photography.

He also has a Facebook page you can “like”: Dennis Tyler Photography on Facebook.

I am so proud of my “big” brother.  He’s the reason I quickly remind people that photography for me is a hobby not a profession.  Many can pick up a camera and craft a few good shots.  The artists, however, consistently move us with their work.