Guest Post| “A Garden Reflection” by Danille Taylor

We are each other’s
harvest:
we are each other’s
business:
we are each other’s
magnitude and bond.

Gwendolyn Brooks

Photo by Photo AC on Pixabay

Today’s post was written by my colleague and friend, Dr. Danille Taylor. She wrote this reflection after working in her garden and seeing the connection between her work and the work in which we must all engage to undo the isms that are destroying humanity.
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I was in the garden yesterday in 90 degree heat digging out weeds. I put a perennial bed in an area where the builder planted bamboo. I contracted to have soil and new plants put in. It was much too much work for my new knees, but the bed wasn’t prepped properly. The bamboo is tenacious! I can neither stomp it out nor can I use poison because of the new plants. I have to dig down and extract the roots. This is tedious back-bending work that requires the right tools so as not kill the new plants–my beauties. I may have to keep weeding for years to rid the garden of the bamboo, but as the gardener, it is my responsibility to protect my beauties. If I get lazy or forget, the bamboo will take over again.
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Ridding this world of all the ‘isms, greed, and inequities requires that we all be gardeners. There is no quick medicine or vaccine. There is only consistent, diligent, hard, and loving work to destroy the roots. But we have to have the right tools.
Each period requires old and new tools, but we must understand the old to be effective now. The energy of Black youth has brought us to this moment much as it did fifty years ago. They are railing at the bamboo that has them in a chokehold.
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If need be, we’ll plant a new garden and properly prepare the bed making sure the soil is rich and nurturing. No poisons allowed. We must remember the “bamboo” may still be there, so we’ll have to be diligent in identifying and uprooting it. We have knowledge and lessons of the past and tools of the future. We will sweat. But the wonderment and beauty we cultivate will feed us. As we weed and dig to extract roots we must not lose our joy.  We see the beauty of the garden we are cultivating.
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Live, breathe, love, and work.

Photo by Photo Mix on Pixabay

My Pretty Bloomers

I know what you’re thinking, but we’re talking about flowers, people! “My Pretty Bloomers” was the name of a swap I participated in for the “Color and Light Photo Swappers” group on swap-bot. Swappers were to share a photo postcard of flowers from their gardens or, in my case, a photo from someone else’s garden.

Here’s the pretty bold bloomer “Ladydy5,” my partner, sent.  She writes, “This flowers every year” and what makes it a “joy to see” is that it was a gift for a special occasion.

Ladydy5's Pretty Bloomer

“Ladydy5’s Bold Bloomer”

I also received a bloomer via email from my photog-penfriend Dee, who happened to be my send-to partner.

Dee's Pretty Bloomer

“Dee’s Sunny Bloomer”

Simply because the sunflower is my favorite flower, I played around with Dee’s photo a bit.  Here are two of my favorite edits.

And from my photog friend Patty (aka Cakers)–

Patty's Pansy

“Patty’s Pansy”

Don’t you just love the deep, rich colors of this pansy?

Like me, Patty doesn’t have a garden, but she has the most beautiful purple clematis plant.  It’s 22-years-old!  The longest I’ve ever kept a plant alive is three years.  I’m tempted to share her clematis photos here, but I’ll save that for her.  She needs to update her blog anyway. Hint! Hint! 😉

The flowers I photographed are from my friend Colleen’s garden.  She has a very pretty garden, full of variety and color.  She has some staples, such as red, pink, and white roses, but she also mixes things up a bit from one year to the next–based on what I’ve seen the last two years.  She even has an awesome vegetable garden in the back of her yard. I nabbed a few pics of grapes yesterday!

I used a few of the photos of Colleen’s garden to create a collage for my partner.

Colleen's Bloomers 2014

Colleen’s Bloomers

This garden deserves a closer look. Don’t you think?  Here’s a sampling of some of the beauties from last year’s garden. (Click an image to view larger)

Purple is my favorite color, so when I see purple in a garden (okay, anywhere), I’m going to snap a photo of it.   Colleen had purple in abundance in last year’s garden and I’m fighting not to include all of them here.  I just learned from her that the tiny pink flowers are some type of rose, something I would have never guessed.

And this year’s garden:

2014 was dominated by pink in varying shades and lots of different roses.  That yellow flower is a knockout rose–another flower I’d never guess is a type of rose.

My mom has the greenest thumb I’ve ever seen. You’d think she’d pass some of her skill and knowledge on to me.  Really, she tried.  Other things vied for my attention.  But I’m really connected with my mom and I can’t look at flowers without thinking of her, so I’ll share with you a photo of one of hers.

My Mother's Zinnia, 2011

My Mother’s Zinnia, 2011

And lastly, because “life” made me a blog slacker in the spring, I’m sharing with you the “yellow flowers” I received for International Women’s Day 2014.  If you’re interested, you can see the ones I sent out here.

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That’s it for now! Enjoy!