The End of the Rainbow with Patti LaBelle | #WordlessWednesday

I’m not sure if you can tell from the photo above, but we saw the end of a rainbow! I’ve seen many rainbows, but I’ve never seen the end of one. My guys and I were so excited that while en route to an open house at my son’s school, we pulled over to capture a shot. It was far more brilliant when we first noticed it, but by the time I grabbed my camera out the trunk, the rainbow had begun to fade.

Who knew that the rainbow ended on the university campus at which I work? And there wasn’t even a pot of gold!

Well, at least we can enjoy the amazing vocal range of Patti LaBelle in [not one but] two “out of this world” performances of “Over the Rainbow”–a 1989 performance at the Apollo Theatre in New York City and a 2014 performance at the White House for President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama. I can’t choose, so I’m leaving you with both.

Until next time…

Women | Words and Art III

We’ve reached the final post of our women’s words and art series. Today’s postcards are just as empowering and inspiring as the previous posts.

Artist: Cyla Costa

Talking back to the ideology that a woman’s place is in the kitchen or bedroom, this art speaks volumes:

A woman’s place is in the resistance.

I “designed” my own postcard featuring Hillary Clinton’s “famous” phrase a few years ago:

Women’s rights are human rights.  –Hilary Clinton, from her speech at the United Nations Fourth Conference on Women, Beijing China

And from [my forever] First Lady of the United States, the timeless instruction our mothers instilled in us when we were children–to never, ever stoop to “their” level:

When they go low, we go high.  –Michelle Obama, Democratic National Convention, 2016

Artist: Cyla Costa

Reinterpreting Reinhold Niebuhr’s “Serenity Prayer,” Angela Davis‘ oft-repeated declaration is another call to become agents of change.

I am no longer accepting the things I cannot change. I am changing the things I cannot accept. –Angela Davis

Even though I want more, more, more revolutionary art, Davis’s quote provides an apt ending. After all, women’s issues can’t be resolved with pretty words and lettering. We’ve got to get up and do something too!

Some of us are traditional activists. We don’t mind taking to the streets and marching or sitting in. Some use writing–letters, poems, opinion pieces, books. Some use art. Some use social media and phone calls. Some choose to approach change through the way we rear our sons and daughters. It all works–as long as the goal is to cultivate a world that does not stifle or limit women’s and girls’ rights, full participation or agency.

If you missed Part 1 or Part 2, be sure to check them out. Then…

Let’s get to work!