#ThursdayTreeLove | TreeArt Part III: A Masterpiece

I’m back with my final TreeArt photo from a late May visit to Burritt on the Mountain.

A gorgeous tree stump arrested my attention just before we entered the “open-air museum,” as the park is described. It was behind a low fence near the entrance, so I walked around the fence to take a few shots. For my son, who is a stickler for rules, the fence meant “don’t go there.” so I had to be quick.

I was mesmerized by the patterns. It had recently rained, so the dampness gave the stump a smooth, polished texture. Isn’t it beautiful?

I’m convinced the “inside” of a tree is one of nature’s most magnificent masterpieces.


I am joining Parul Thakur for #ThursdayTreeLove every second and fourth Thursday of the month. If you would like to play along, post a picture of a tree on your blog and link it back to her latest #treelove post.

#ThursdayTreeLove | TreeArt Part II: Shadow and Light

We find beauty not in the thing itself but in the patterns of shadows, the light and the darkness, that one thing against another creates…Were it not for shadows, there would be no beauty.  –Junichiro Tanizaki, In Praise of Shadows, 1933

I don’t know about you, but I really need time to slow down a bit. How are we already at the end of June? I am trying to savor this summer, but it’s almost impossible since I really haven’t begun my summer break yet (meetings and tying up too many loose ends of a crazy COVID semester). I will have to work a lot of tree love into the remaining five weeks if I am to face a new academic year with at least a little sanity.

Anyway, I’m back, as promised, with the second installment of TreeArt. The photos aren’t spectacular, but I I was drawn to these particular shots because of the interplay of shadow and light.

I failed to mention in TreeArt Part I that the photos for this three-part series were shot at Burritt on the Mountain in Huntsville, Alabama.

If you want way more Burritt tree love [and autumn loveliness] you should check out my November 2016 post, Walk to the Cross.

Until next time…


I am joining Parul Thakur for #ThursdayTreeLove every second and fourth Thursday of the month. If you would like to play along, post a picture of a tree on your blog and link it back to her latest #treelove post.

Just Because | A Packet of Flowers

Earlier today, I read Our Little Red House’s “spring’s hello to fall” post and that reminded me that I have had flower photographs by Rift Vegan sitting in my WP media library since September. The flowers, photographed from May to August, are from her garden and her various excursions in and around Eugene, Oregon.

Here’s the set:

Forget Me Nots. Photo by Rift V.

Peace. Hybrid Tea Rose. Photo by Rift V.

The Peace Rose was captured at Owen Rose Garden where Rift enjoys walking along the Riverbank Path. The Peace Rose, made famous by the U.S. Postage stamp, is her favorite to photograph.

Lady Beetle on Love-in-a-mist. Photo by Rift V.

Rift reports that the Love-in-a-mist flower self-seeds better than the sunflowers in her garden.

Wild Geranium? Photo by Rift V.

Rift doesn’t know what type of flower this is, but she thinks it is a type of wild geranium. The bright green center and the deeply colored “veins” are fascinating [Is that what all the lines are called?].

Columbia Lilies. Photo by Rift V.

According to Rift, Columbia Lilies are often mistaken for Tiger Lilies, the garden flower from Asia. These were found in the middle of the forest in the Pacific Northwest.

The flowers are becoming rare, Rift says, because people dig them up to plant in their own gardens–where they don’t do well. :-/ This makes the flower more enjoyable when she sees them in their natural environment.

Sunflowers. Photo by Rift V.

I used this sunflower for my first day of autumn post. It is one of three types of sunflowers that grow in her garden. The blossoms of this stunning dark rusty flower are only about eight inches across. All the birds snubbed the seeds from this particular type of sunflower, but she couldn’t vouch for the seeds–since she didn’t taste them either. 🙂

Rift, who is in the A Thousand Words group on swap-bot, sent the photographs “just because.” Isn’t that the best reason to send and receive flowers?

Snapshots from an Early Evening Walk

As I mentioned in the previous post, my guys and I took an evening walk some days ago in a nearby nature preserve to see if we could spot the recently released rabbits that were under our care. We didn’t find the bunnies, but we found nature being her wild best.

We love walking in this park. We encounter beauty with each step, whether on the open trail which frames the pond, or the covered trails where we’re more likely to encounter the creatures that make the park their home.

Though much of the brilliance of summer has faded, there’s still so much to enjoy: Unloved flowers showcasing their beauty for those who have learned to see it.

Bugs that feast on the flowers. [Look closely]

Sun-kissed clouds floating above the trees, making way for night.

Random splashes of color.

Feasts for birds…

and the smallest animals.

Remains of fallen trees that continue to give life.

A surprise gift–a moth waiting patiently to be photographed.

A brightly colored flower captured as we exited a trail.

The final gift of the evening.

I hope you take some time this weekend to sit [or walk] quietly in nature, find strength, heal your soul, connect with the Divine.