1LW: Shake Off the Dust and Rise Up

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Shake off your dust;
    rise up, sit enthroned, Jerusalem.
Free yourself from the chains on your neck,
    Daughter Zion, now a captive.

Isaiah 52:2 NIV

If I had the skills of some of my talented artist friends I would illustrate the Bible verse above. There is amazing beauty in the images of shaking off the dust of grief and fear, of rising up from the muck and mire, of breaking psychological and circumstantial chains and walking in freedom to our rightful throne as a daughter [or son] of the Most High.

I’m thinking of this verse today because I am [finally] starting to put together my one little word (1LW) journal, and it is the key scripture for my current word—RISE.

I have had little motivation to grapple with my 1LW, so my friend Cy of Pink Nabi and I challenged each other to work with our words this week. I’ve been randomly collecting [my own] thoughts, artwork, and poems, but have not pulled anything together. Despite my lack of intentionality in this regard, I see how God has been working in me all along—healing, loosening the chains, and providing the strength for me to “rise up” from the dust.

Out of all the “rise” scriptures, I’m most drawn to Isaiah 52:2. I understand the historical context of the scripture and its call to ancient Israel, but I find its message applicable for us: It reminds us that we have already been set free from everything that binds us. When we act on the decision to rise, we’ll find the chains have already been loosened—and our throne awaiting.

Peace Reigns…

“Peace Reigns Over River.” Artist: Qiu Ying, Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). Ink and color on silk.

Sacred hearts
Powered by love and above —
Energies of peace
Lily Wang

I received the postcard above a week or so ago and I have been seriously fascinated by it. According to the information provided on the postcard, this is only a part of Qiu Ying’s “Peace Reigns Over River.” That is difficult to imagine since the partial painting is filled with so many fine details and dozens upon dozens of stories. [Click the image twice for a closer look].

Qui Ying was a Chinese painter, one of four master artists of the Ming Dynasty. According to the brief biography on ArtNet, he “specialized in the gongbi technique, in which the brush was used to describe forms without flourish or expressive variation.” You can read more about Qui Ying here: China Online Museum.

The postcard was sent to me by my friend, Cy, who studies Chinese art and culture. In her message she pointed out some of the beautiful blessings of life, noting that though we are friends “in real life,” we have also been penpals for 30 years (Wow!): She writes:

Here’s to–photo walks during the day; beautiful scenes from nature; a new book by your favorite writer; being in your happy place; having your truths set you free; “liking” the love of your life; getting lost in a beautiful place; receiving mail from a penpal of 30 years.

To that we’ll add–the reign of peace and “sacred hearts” energized by “Love.”

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A Second Look | Pink Nabi

“Seeing Again,” Photo by Cy of Pink Nabi

Sometimes I miss the full beauty of my own path because it’s a dark mental day or because it’s raining in my life. I withdraw from opportunities or invitations because I can’t really see the beauty of the proposal the first time around. This month was a pretty dreary month physically and mentally. I was forced to “see” something that I had been ignoring for a year. But I also took a second look at something that had frightened me. I still want to run from this new thing, but it is an opportunity to have a very beautiful experience that I wouldn’t have otherwise.

Thankfully, second chances exist to reset our lives. It’s good to pause and take a second look just in case we miss the value of a thing the first time around.  –Cy, “Seeing Again,” Pink Nabi


Today’s post features an image and quote from my friend, Cy at Pink Nabi. I introduced her to #ThursdayTreeLove as a way for us to take a photo walk together although we are miles apart. She willingly plays along. Her meditation on her latest tree love resonates because I’m familiar with trauma and the need to take a second look–to grow, to move forward, to heal. For the full context, visit her original post: Seeing Again.