Berries.

I wish to live because life has within it that which is good, that which is beautiful, and that which is love. Therefore, since I have known all of these things, I have found them reason enough and–I wish to live. –Lorraine Hansberry, To Be Young, Gifted, and Black

Still Dews.

“Vetch and Milk Thistle.” Photographer, Art Wolfe.

As I head into the weekend and to Sabbath rest, I am whispering in my spirit the penultimate verse of John Greenleaf Whittier’s poem, “Soma.”

Many recognize the words from the hymn, “Dear Lord and Father of Mankind,” but do not know they come from the longer poem. What they also may not know is that Whittier–seeing it as showy or unnecessarily dramatic–was not a fan of singing in church; he believed that God should be worshipped in silent meditation.

Worshipping God through song is the gift I can always offer [alone and with other worshippers], so I do not agree with Whittier’s stance. However, there is incredible value in quiet contemplation and meditation, so on that point, he gets no argument from me.

May these last two verses from “Soma” usher you into a period of quiet rest, meditation, and contemplation.

from “Soma”
John Greenleaf Whittier

Drop thy still dews of quietness,
Till all our strivings cease;
Take from our souls the strain and stress,
And let our ordered lives confess
Thy beauty of Thy peace.

Breathe through the hearts of our desire
Thy coolness and Thy balm;
Let sense be numb, let flesh retire;
Speak through the earthquake, wind, and fire,
O still, small voice of calm!


About the image: The card above came from Karen B, one of my partners for Love Notes 31. The “Vetch and Milk Thistle” scene–from Cappadocia, Turkey–was shot  by photographer-conservationist Art Wolfe.  A portion of the proceeds of the Pomegranate card supports the Sierra Club’s efforts to preserve and protect our planet.

Finding Color with the Tiny One

“The Little Explorer”

Mere color, unspoiled by meaning, and unallied with definite form, can speak to the soul in a thousand different ways. –Oscar Wilde

The Southern magnolias are blooming and spring is breathing her last. Last week when we visited my cousin and her family, her daughter who is four, noticed me photographing the magnolias and the tiny purple flowers near the front door and made it her job to find all the remnants of color and flowers left in the garden.

So while the guys looked over a “fixer-upper” vintage Corvette, we searched for all the bits of color still hanging on in the garden. [Click images for a closer look].

We found pink in “once roses.”

 

Purple, always camera-ready.

 

Almost-missed yellow hiding out in all the green.

 

White hydrangeas hiding in the shade of trees in the front garden. And my favorite “unloved” flower, dandelions, in the back.

 

Green, of course–new holly berries and lettuce, one of the many leafy greens growing in their back garden.

 

Purplish/blue hydrangeas hiding against the back fence. [They look purplish here, but they really were more bluish “in real life.”]

And more purple from the lamb’s ears plant that I’m sure was some small animal’s feast.

We found a tiny green heart-shaped leaf.

And lots of colorful flowers on the little explorer’s skirt.

These photos aren’t so great. In our search for color, I simply followed directives. The tiny one was a taskmaster, so there was little time for composition and focus.

Just as we had exhausted color in the front yard, their neighbor’s dogs came charging at us full speed and barking ferociously. That was my favorite part of our adventure. Not! I stood shock-still in terror while the tiny one stood chatting away, oblivious to the danger the dogs posed.

It’s amazing how quickly things change. Just weeks ago their gardens–front and back–were exploding with color. I missed the hydrangeas and roses in full bloom, but I managed to capture the Japanese magnolias and apple blossoms.  I have yet to post the apple blossoms on the blog, but if you missed their gorgeous magnolia, click the link and take a look. They’re certainly a treat for the eyes and soul.

Wishing you a weekend full of color and light…

“A Few of My Favorite Things”

What do you do with the “leftover,” extra photos cluttering your workspace or filling boxes?  Do you toss them?  Repurpose them?  Give them away?  One of the things I enjoy doing with my extra photos is “destashing” them through Sharp Shooters, a group on swap-bot.  I typically host a “destash” swap quarterly, so Sharp Shooters can “unload” their extras on someone who can use them.  The swaps typically call for “destashing” at least 5-7 different photos and swappers can send the photos “as is” or make notecards, postcards or collages with them before sending them to their partners.

Maggie, “an Australian gal,” sent an amazing package of 30 photos!  She went way beyond expectation and thoughtfully selected photos with a few of my favorite things in mind–water, nature, and the color pink.  These just happen to be some of her favorites as well.  She packaged each set separately in self-made envelopes with a bit of explanation on one side and washi tape on the other.

I bet you can guess from the washi tape colors which set of photos each envelope held.

All the water photos were taken around various beaches in and around Melbourne, Victoria, with the exception of the cute duck. The duck was taken at the lake of the Royal Melbourne Botanical Gardens. Maggie admits being “addicted to the water,” so it’s one of her favorite things to capture on camera.

Most of the nature photos were taken around her neighborhood during the spring and summer.  Some were “staged” shots in her home.

Maggie “loves pink…it’s as simple as that!”  For her, finding pink flowers to photograph is a pleasure, so she sent many beautiful pink flowers. She also included a seahorse skeleton her sister found at the beach many years ago.  The skeleton isn’t pink, but the background is.

I have so many plans for Maggie’s photos!  Some are headed for the “Wall of Inspiration” in my “work” office, and others will find a home in my 2014 Project Life album.

Maggie is a design student and has an Etsy shop where she sells some of her fine art prints and notecards.  If you love her photos and want to see more, check out her store.

For now…enjoy!

In Search of the Perfect Rose…Photo, That Is

I hosted and obviously participated in the “One Perfect Rose” photo swap on swap-bot–in honor of Dorothy Parker’s poem “One Perfect Rose.”  My swap partner was pleased with the three rose photos I sent her.  She liked the softness of the roses, but I’m not so convinced.  I have been trying to capture the perfect rose shot for years and I still haven’t “gotten it.”  What’s the secret to those perfect rose shots I see all over Flickr and Hallmark cards? Is it angle?  Lighting?  If you have any tips for me, please share!  Here are some of my rose shots.  I even shot some on my iPhone.

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The “Post-Katrina Rose” is really special to me.  It was the first sign of color I saw after Hurricane Katrina left New Orleans brown and gray (in 2005).  It served as a beautiful reminder that we can find something beautiful in even the most horrific circumstances.

Have you taken any great (or not so great) rose photos?