The End of the Rainbow with Patti LaBelle | #WordlessWednesday

I’m not sure if you can tell from the photo above, but we saw the end of a rainbow! I’ve seen many rainbows, but I’ve never seen the end of one. My guys and I were so excited that while en route to an open house at my son’s school, we pulled over to capture a shot. It was far more brilliant when we first noticed it, but by the time I grabbed my camera out the trunk, the rainbow had begun to fade.

Who knew that the rainbow ended on the university campus at which I work? And there wasn’t even a pot of gold!

Well, at least we can enjoy the amazing vocal range of Patti LaBelle in [not one but] two “out of this world” performances of “Over the Rainbow”–a 1989 performance at the Apollo Theatre in New York City and a 2014 performance at the White House for President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama. I can’t choose, so I’m leaving you with both.

Until next time…

Our Hearts Unhinged…

“Non-violence.” Photo by Louise Mamet, Caen WWII Memorial.

A few years ago, following the shooting at Umpqua Community College in Oregon, President Obama said “our thoughts and prayers are not enough.” His argument was that we must back up our prayers with action–legislation that makes it difficult for individuals to purchase the type of weapons that can enact a massacre in seconds.

“Thoughts and prayers,” was again the trite refrain following two mass shootings in the United States this weekend. But neither thoughts and prayers nor legislation are enough. Sadly, no gun legislation will prevent hate and misdirected anger; determined people will always find a way to accomplish their nefarious goals.

As a nation we must do soul work. “Faith without works is dead,” so God to Whom we direct our prayers expects us to do the work. We must wrestle with the ugly truths that are part of who we are, that make such actions possible.

We must unearth the thing in people’s hearts that breeds thoughts that result in wanton disregard for life. We must work to transform individuals and the soul of our nation from the inside out.

We’re weary, yes, but from the weariness we must find a different path.

This year, we’ve done laps around despair;
and we’ve grown tired of running in circles
so we stepped off the track and began to walk.
As the earth shifted beneath our feet,
we moved forward together. Our hearts
unhinged, guide us toward a [nation]
remade by love, into a future
that our past could never have imagined,
beginning today.

Excerpt from “Reimagining History,” by Marcus Amaker and Marjory Wentworth for the 2016 Charleston Mayoral Inauguration.


About the image: Today’s image was shot by my photographer friend Louise Mamet at the Caen WWII Memorial in Normandy. Thank you for the use of your image, Louise!

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Wisdom from My Dad: If He Fails, We All Fail

I had no intention of watching the inauguration of the 45th president of the U.S.A. or any of the inaugural festivities. In fact, if I could hide from media coverage of the presidency for the next four years, I would.  The grace, dignity, intellect, and character of President Barack Obama makes the Trump we’ve seen thus far a hard, hard pill to swallow, but my dad checked my attitude with the advice he posted on Facebook this morning:

Well folks, today is the day. “Out with the old, in with the new.” I hear that some are asking us to not watch the inauguration.  I disagree.  My dislike of Trump is not so much his politics but his character. If you believe MLK’s words, don’t judge a person by the color of their skin, but by their character.  Trump doesn’t meet the standard of what I consider a person with good morals.  No matter. He is in.  My job is to watch how he acts as POTUS. We must not be foolish and hope he fails.  If he fails, we all fail.

If he fails, we all fail.

Regardless of our political leanings, it’s our job to “stay woke,” as my 70+ year old colleague in academia expresses, and see to it that Trump and his administration work on behalf of the citizens of the United States and, where necessary, of the world–especially those who are disenfranchised and suffering under the weight of systemic oppression.  We must march on and continue the fight in every reasonable way possible.  (Because) No matter who is president, “the struggle is [all too] real” for too many of us and we have a long, long way to go.