Beauty and Purpose

Zinnias by Rift Vegan

Today,  I [re]opened a purple envelope filled with beautiful blooms photographed by Rift Vegan, one of my A Thousand Words pals on swap-bot. She sent the flowers a year ago for “Pink and Purple Awareness,” a swap organized to raise awareness and honor victims and survivors of breast cancer and domestic violence.

Here are her photos with her notes:

“Beauty Berry” by Rift Vegan

This lovely plant is actually native to your area, not mine! They plant all kinds of interesting things at the Rhododendron Garden at Hendricks Park–a favorite place to hike!

“Cosmos at the Community Garden” by Rift Vegan

“Rhododendron” by Rift Vegan

This photo was shot early October last year, so Rift wrote:

Prime time for the rhodys is April, but there are outliers that keep the garden in color all year round.

“Asters” by Rift Vegan

I love asters, but they tend to die when I plant them at my community garden plot. It’s been a few years though. It might be time to try again!

“Pretty” by Rift Vegan

I don’t know what this is, but it’s pretty!

As I read Rift’s notes and tidbits of information, I felt like I was taking a walk with her through the gardens. Along with the pictures, she enclosed a much longer note relating her “pink and purple” stories.

Having lost two sisters to breast cancer and a cousin and acquaintances to domestic violence, these issues are dear to my heart. Of course, the problems cannot be solved with flowers. The flowers are simply a beautiful way to honor their strength and remind us of hope.


Update: Thanks to Darren, the ArtyPlantman, I now know the “pretty” flower is called Osteospermum. Of course, the Arty Plantman would know! Thanks, Darren!

Just Because | A Packet of Flowers

Earlier today, I read Our Little Red House’s “spring’s hello to fall” post and that reminded me that I have had flower photographs by Rift Vegan sitting in my WP media library since September. The flowers, photographed from May to August, are from her garden and her various excursions in and around Eugene, Oregon.

Here’s the set:

Forget Me Nots. Photo by Rift V.

Peace. Hybrid Tea Rose. Photo by Rift V.

The Peace Rose was captured at Owen Rose Garden where Rift enjoys walking along the Riverbank Path. The Peace Rose, made famous by the U.S. Postage stamp, is her favorite to photograph.

Lady Beetle on Love-in-a-mist. Photo by Rift V.

Rift reports that the Love-in-a-mist flower self-seeds better than the sunflowers in her garden.

Wild Geranium? Photo by Rift V.

Rift doesn’t know what type of flower this is, but she thinks it is a type of wild geranium. The bright green center and the deeply colored “veins” are fascinating [Is that what all the lines are called?].

Columbia Lilies. Photo by Rift V.

According to Rift, Columbia Lilies are often mistaken for Tiger Lilies, the garden flower from Asia. These were found in the middle of the forest in the Pacific Northwest.

The flowers are becoming rare, Rift says, because people dig them up to plant in their own gardens–where they don’t do well. :-/ This makes the flower more enjoyable when she sees them in their natural environment.

Sunflowers. Photo by Rift V.

I used this sunflower for my first day of autumn post. It is one of three types of sunflowers that grow in her garden. The blossoms of this stunning dark rusty flower are only about eight inches across. All the birds snubbed the seeds from this particular type of sunflower, but she couldn’t vouch for the seeds–since she didn’t taste them either. 🙂

Rift, who is in the A Thousand Words group on swap-bot, sent the photographs “just because.” Isn’t that the best reason to send and receive flowers?